I got in the Denver Post today. Check it out!

Good Evening Everyone,

I wrote my first ever letter to the editor in regards to the Idaho Stop in Denver… and got it published. Though I talked a lot about projects I had been working on in my newsletter, I just wanted to highlight this because I thought it was a good piece. Below is the text reprinted:

“In a recent vote of 6-2, the City of Thornton adopted a measure that will allow bicyclists to “slow-roll” through stop signs. Known as the “Idaho stop” based off of the state where the practice originated, this is a good policy that should be adopted in Denver.

With the recent legislation at the state level that gives municipalities a framework of how to adopt Idaho stop policies, Denver is ripe for a change that, according to studies, increases bicyclist safety. In a city like Denver where motorist/bicycle accidents have remained constant despite Mayor Michael Hancock’s pledge to accomplish the goals of Vision Zero, adopting a slow-roll policy is a step to fulfill that pledge.”

 

On a related note, If you are at Civic Center Park for the Ice Climbing Championships, I may be there on Sunday checking at the fat tire bikes. Be sure to say hello if you see me!

Sincerely,

Loren Hansen

*Photo is of the Author’s Bike*

I am mapping out all of the public bike parking in Denver… and I need your help!

Good Evening Everyone!

Along with other projects I have been working on over the past 3 months, I am starting to build out a map of places to park and lock bicycles around Denver. Given that I will be fairly busy with other  writing projects, I NEED YOUR HELP.

If you are interested in participating in this project, be sure to email me here with a picture and location of the bicycle parking you see.

Before you send a picture of the bike racks you see, make sure they are the following:

1. Public, Free and Accessible

Generally has to be in a public place and available for anyone who is riding a bike to park it. I would not consider a private bike locker at an apartment complex or work to be either. The bike lockers at RTD probably fall in the “Not Free/Accessible” category as well because you have to pay for them.

2. Relatively Secure.

I have seen bike parking areas that are held down by a single screw in various parts of town that are fairly unsafe to park a bike with a basic ulock/cable combo because of how structurally unsound they are. Something like that would not be included or included with that qualification.

3. (Generally) made for bicycle parking/locking.

There is some ambiguity here, but locking up to a meter/pole/tree is not something I would consider bike parking. Whatever the structure is, the form must (generally) be built for bike parking, whether it is a rack or something else.

Break Over! Lets get back to writing.

Good morning everyone!

I hope you had a good Thanksgiving with friends and/or family. I certainly did, and had a TON of wonderful vegetarian treats.

Now, I have a few items in the works, including a new DenverUrbanism article coming out within the next week or so, a bunch of shorter narrative essays I have written, and the beginnings of a new serial series, The Polybius Diagnosis, that will launch midweek.

I also have created a newsletter that regular readers can subscribe to to get updates on various writing projects. I promise not to spam your inbox… I hate when companies do it to me. Newsletters will be sent out twice a month, and contain the “highlights” of my writing work!

Have a good week, and hope you can get through the rest of your leftovers!

*featured photo is myself with Hazel, my relatives family dog, in Georgia*